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Wherever there are numerical data that are very large in value, replacement text may be better for explanatory purposes. The sub_large_vals() function allows for this replacement through specification of a threshold, a large_pattern, and the sign (positive or negative) of the values to be considered.

Usage

sub_large_vals(
  data,
  columns = everything(),
  rows = everything(),
  threshold = 1e+12,
  large_pattern = ">={x}",
  sign = "+"
)

Arguments

data

A table object that is created using the gt() function.

columns

The columns to format. Can either be a series of column names provided in c(), a vector of column indices, or a helper function focused on selections. The select helper functions are: starts_with(), ends_with(), contains(), matches(), one_of(), num_range(), and everything().

rows

Optional rows to format. Providing everything() (the default) results in all rows in columns being formatted. Alternatively, we can supply a vector of row captions within c(), a vector of row indices, or a helper function focused on selections. The select helper functions are: starts_with(), ends_with(), contains(), matches(), one_of(), num_range(), and everything(). We can also use expressions to filter down to the rows we need (e.g., [colname_1] > 100 & [colname_2] < 50).

threshold

The threshold value with which values should be considered large enough for replacement.

large_pattern

The pattern text to be used in place of the suitably large values in the rendered table.

sign

The sign of the numbers to be considered in the replacement. By default, we only consider positive values ("+"). The other option ("-") can be used to consider only negative values.

Value

An object of class gt_tbl.

Details

Targeting of values is done through columns and additionally by rows (if nothing is provided for rows then entire columns are selected). Conditional formatting is possible by providing a conditional expression to the rows argument. See the Arguments section for more information on this.

Examples

Let's generate a simple, single-column tibble that contains an assortment of values that could potentially undergo some substitution.

tbl <- dplyr::tibble(num = c(0, NA, 10^(8:14)))

tbl
#> # A tibble: 9 x 1
#>     num
#>   <dbl>
#> 1  0   
#> 2 NA   
#> 3  1e 8
#> 4  1e 9
#> 5  1e10
#> 6  1e11
#> 7  1e12
#> 8  1e13
#> 9  1e14

The tbl object contains a variety of larger numbers and some might be larger enough to reformat with a threshold value. With sub_large_vals() we can do just that:

tbl %>%
  gt() %>%
  fmt_number(columns = num) %>%
  sub_large_vals()

This image of a table was generated from the first code example in the `sub_large_vals()` help file.

Large negative values can also be handled but they are handled specially by the sign parameter. Setting that to "-" will format only the large values that are negative. Notice that with the default large_pattern value of ">={x}" the ">=" is automatically changed to "<=".

tbl %>%
  dplyr::mutate(num = -num) %>%
  gt() %>%
  fmt_number(columns = num) %>%
  sub_large_vals(sign = "-")

This image of a table was generated from the second code example in the `sub_large_vals()` help file.

You don't have to settle with the default threshold value or the default replacement pattern (in large_pattern). This can be changed and the "{x}" in large_pattern (which uses the threshold value) can even be omitted.

tbl %>%
  gt() %>%
  fmt_number(columns = num) %>%
  sub_large_vals(
    threshold = 5E10,
    large_pattern = "hugemongous"
  )

This image of a table was generated from the third code example in the `sub_large_vals()` help file.

Function ID

3-20